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2015 Report Card

Please select a section of the 2014 Report Card:

Health & Nutrition

2014 Accomplishments

  1. The total number of meals served by the CYFD Summer Food Service Program totaled 1,995,108 in Fiscal Year 2014, which is an increase from Fiscal Year 2013.

  2. CYFD administered the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), providing healthy meals to children in both child care centers and homes throughout New Mexico. In Fiscal Year 2014, the average number of meals served per month was 1,494,052. .

  3. ATo perform nutrition education outreach, CYFD partnered with local Child and Adult Food Care Programs to administer Regional Early Care and Education Conferences (RECEC) throughout NM. These conferences train child care providers in health and nutrition education.

  4. During fiscal year 2014, $636 million in food stamps were issued to an estimated 424,107 New Mexicans, 193,185 of whom were children. An estimated 84.44% of eligible children participated in the food stamps program.

  5. During Fiscal Year 2014, The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program distributed $47.2 million to an estimated 34,778 individuals, 25,400 of whom were children. The New Mexico Works Program helped move many people from welfare to work, including 2,413 individuals who gained full-time employment and 2,549 individuals who gained part-time employment. An estimated 95% of participating individuals started at a wage equal to or greater than $7.50 per hour. An estimated 15,930 children 6 to 18 years old received an annual clothing allowance of $50.00 in August 2013, for a total of $796,350 in fiscal year 2014.

  6. BDOH increased the number of New Mexicans receiving WIC, serving 56,000 participants a month, despite a decline in the number of people WIC serves nationally. New Mexico’s food grant for Federal Fiscal Year 2013 was $28,609,164. WIC cost containment initiatives generated $1.7 billion in taxpayer savings in FY2012 and $1.9 billion in savings in FY2013.

    • Adjunctive eligibility, which designates families participating in SNAP, TANF, and Medicaid as automatically income-eligible for WIC, saves time and administrative costs for WIC as these other programs have already verified the accuracy of income information. Connecting Medicaid clients with WIC preventive services saves Medicaid healthcare dollars because mothers have healthier pregnancies, birth outcomes, and children.

  7. Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (HKHC) builds dynamic state and local partnerships to expand children’s opportunities for healthy eating and physical activity where they live, learn, and play. Stretching across 9 counties, 4 tribal communities, and 22 school districts, HKHC reaches 24% of the New Mexico elementary school-age population. In the past two years, at least 83% of students in HKHC public elementary schools have had increased healthy eating opportunities on a regular basis (classroom fruit and vegetable tastings, salad bars or pre-made salads, and fruits and vegetables offered as snacks), and 64% have had increased physical activity opportunities before, during and after school (regular walk and roll to school programs, mileage clubs, and schoolyards open to community use). Moreover, these communities have collectively engaged more than 400 entities as partners, enabling them to leverage $2.7 million since 2012.

    Thanks to HKHC’s efforts, along with those of other state and local groups, childhood obesity has stopped increasing and begun declining. In the last four years, obesity rates for third grade students have decreased by 11.9%, falling from 22.6% in 2010 to 19.9% in 2013. Furthermore, American Indian elementary students, the group with the highest obesity rates, have seen the largest decrease (19.4%), going from 36.6% in 2010 to 29.5% in 2013.

Programs & Services

Child and Adult Care/Summer Food Program- CYFD

Through agreements with community-based non-profit organizations and eligible for-profit organizations, the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) provides reimbursement to childcare providers for nutritious meals and snacks served to primarily low-income children in child care settings. Adult Day Care centers that are licensed and provide care to adults in non-residential settings are also reimbursed through this program. The program is administered by the Family Nutrition Bureau (FNB) and is 100% federally-funded.

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), provides nutritious meals to children during the summer when school is not in session. FNB enters into agreements with local nonprofit sponsoring agencies, local government agencies, faith-based organizations, summer camps, school food authorities and other eligible institutions to administer the SFSP at the local level.

Budget Implications:The Family Nutrition Bureau which houses the Child and Adult Care and Summer Food Program. It is funded solely with federal dollars.

Healthy Kids New Mexico (HKNM)

Healthy Kids New Mexico (HKNM), a project of the New Mexico Department of Health, builds state and local partnerships to expand children’s opportunities for healthy eating and active living where they live, learn and play.

Budget Implications: Fiscal Year 2014: Federal - $2,090,857

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Behavioral Health Services

Community Outreach and Behavioral Health provides the following: Oversight of community-based behavioral health services, community-based service development ,support to JJS, PS, and ECS Licensing and Certification Authority (LCA) activities, supportive housing, community volunteerism programs, Medicaid eligibility assistance.

Budget Implications: CYFD Behavioral Health Services are provided utilizing state General Fund and federal grant dollars.

Maternal & Child Health (DOH)

Maternal & Child Health (MCH) serves mothers and children ages pre-birth to age eight. Prenatal care is provided through the licensing and regulation of midwifery care in NM. MCH regulates both Licensed Midwives (home births) and Certified Nurse Midwives. About 30% of all births in New Mexico were attended by midwives, and untold hours of prenatal and postpartum care were provided by these midwives.

For the next three years, MCH/Child Health will focus on expanding developmental screening activities for children, ages birth-three years, in early care and education and linking training and increasing appropriate referrals when needed among medical homes, early intervention services, child care programs, and families. Using Results Based Accountability and the Collective Impact approach, the State Team will work on a common agenda to expand developmental screening activities. Contributions from multiple sectors will be aligned toward specific measureable results.

Budget Implications: The MCH budget ($2,084,674) is 80% Federal funds and 20% state general funds. 15,164 children were served.

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Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (DOH)

Children’s Medical Services (CMS) program provides services for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disabling conditions in children. It is a statewide program within the Department of Health, Public Health Division. CMS serves children from birth to 21 with chronic illnesses or medical conditions that require surgical or medical treatment. CMS offers medical coverage, information and referral, and care coordination. CMS social workers assist clients to coordinate health, medical and other community resources as they develop and meet child and family goals. Families participate as partners in decision-making regarding their children’s medical care and other services. Services are coordinated in partnership with the local primary care provider / medical home. Talking with a CMS social worker can help families communicate well with the child’s primary care physician and obtain the medical and educational services that their child needs. CMS sponsors community-based asthma, cleft palate, neurology, metabolic, nephrology, genetic and endocrinology clinics throughout the state in collaboration with the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center and Presbyterian Hospital to improve access to pediatric specialty care. CMS collaborates with community partners throughout the State to improve the health care infrastructure for children and youth with special health care needs including access to a medical home, community based culturally competent health care and adequate health care financing.

Budget Implications: The CMS budget ($6,967,641,000) is 57% Federal funds and 43% state general funds.

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New Mexico Women, Infant, and Children Program (WIC) (DOH)

The major focus of the New Mexico WIC Program is to safeguard the health of nutritionally at-risk low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, infant, children and seniors by providing nutritious foods to supplement diets, nutrition information for healthy eating, health counseling, breastfeeding support, nutrition classes, cooking classes, and referrals to health care providers and social services. WIC offers new foods like fresh, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables, whole grain cereal, bread, corn and whole wheat tortillas, brown rice, oatmeal, soy milk, tofu, canned beans, and baby food. WIC also provides, milk, eggs, cheese, beans, peanut butter, carrots, tuna, juices, cereal, infant formula and baby cereal. WIC is a Federal grant program for which Congress authorizes a specific amount of funding each year for program operations.

Budget Implications: $57,706,000.00 FFY 13 Budget , 43,815,000.00 Federal and $891,000.00 State, $13,000,000.00 Rebate-Food Funds

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Student Nutrition (PED)

The Student Nutrition Bureau administers National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs which are federally assisted meal programs operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. Other federal programs administered by the Student Nutrition Bureau include Breakfast After the Bell, Seamless Summer, Special Milk, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable, and Locally Grown Fresh Fruit and Vegetable programs.

Budget Implications: The program used $123 million in federal funds and $1.9 million in state funds to serve nearly 237,000 students in FY13

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Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (DOH)

Children’s Medical Services (CMS) program provides services for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disabling conditions in children. It is a statewide program within the Department of Health, Public Health Division. CMS serves children from birth to 21 with chronic illnesses or medical conditions that require surgical or medical treatment. CMS offers medical coverage, information and referral, and care coordination. CMS social workers assist clients to coordinate health, medical and other community resources as they develop and meet child and family goals. Families participate as partners in decision-making regarding their children’s medical care and other services. Services are coordinated in partnership with the local primary care provider / medical home. Talking with a CMS social worker can help families communicate well with the child’s primary care physician and obtain the medical and educational services that their child needs. CMS sponsors community-based asthma, cleft palate, neurology, metabolic, nephrology, genetic and endocrinology clinics throughout the state in collaboration with the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center and Presbyterian Hospital to improve access to pediatric specialty care. CMS collaborates with community partners throughout the State to improve the health care infrastructure for children and youth with special health care needs including access to a medical home, community based culturally competent health care and adequate health care financing.

Budget Implications: $6,967,641.00

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Legislative Achievements

HB271 K-12 BREAKFAST AFTER THE BELL PROGRAM (REP. MARTINEZ)

This legislation expanded the "Breakfast after the Bell" program to all schools where 85% or more of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. This will increase the number of poor kids in middle and high school receiving free breakfast at school.

SB75 EMERGENCY MEDICATION IN SCHOOLS (REP. HERRELL; SEN. MOORES)

This legislation permits each local school board or governing body of a charter school to provide its schools with a stock supply of albuterol as well as a stock supply of epinephrine to administer to children in case a child suffers an asthma attack or an allergic reaction. The new law has the potential to save many lives.

SB58 COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS ACT (SEN. PAPEN)

This legislation established a voluntary certification program for Community Health Workers (CHWs) in New Mexico. This will allow CHWs to receive Medicaid reimbursement for Medicaid-eligible services. SB 58 brought awareness to the role that CHWs play in optimizing health outcomes, counseling, and support services for New Mexico families.

SB119 EXPEDITED NURSE FROM OTHER STATE LICENSURE (REP. TAYLOR; SEN. SHENDO)

This legislation required the Board of Nursing to license any qualified out-of-state nurse applicant within five business days. This will help to attract nurses to New Mexico from other states, increasing our healthcare workforce and providing better care for New Mexico families.

HB9 REQUIRE NEWBORN INFANT HEART DISEASE TESTING (REP. ESPINOZA)

This legislation added Critical Congenital Heart Defect (CCHD) to the Newborn Screening Panel, mandating the screening of all newborns for CCHD prior to discharge from the hospital or birthing center. CCHD is the most common cause of death in the first year of life. This bill will help ensure CCHD is detected early, and save lives.

Proposed Next Steps

Step 1:
The Department of Health will work to ensure that no eligible WIC applicants are turned away.
Step 2:
Work to maintain current and anticipated WIC participation levels and respond adequately to economic forecasts of rising food cost inflation.
Step 3:
Work to continue to increase breastfeeding rates and support. New Mexico seeks to remain a nationally recognized (FY 2014) ranked state for breastfeeding duration.
Step 4:
Expand the Healthy Kids Healthy Communities multi-sector coalition model to more communities, including tribal communities. If this is done, more New Mexicans will have access to healthy eating and physical activity opportunities and there will be lower rates of obesity.
Step 5:
Partner with the Children, Youth, and Families Department to support childcare providers in making healthy eating and physical activity a part of children’s daily routines. If this is done, more children will be exposed to healthy lifestyle behaviors at an earlier age and the likelihood of their becoming obese will be reduced.
Step 6:
The Indian Affairs Department (IAD) will work on a new strategic plan to ensure collaboration with other state agencies and their initiatives. Specifically, IAD will be coordinating more closely with the Public Education Department (PED) to support programs or projects that relate to Nutrition and Exercise education for Native American children.

Partnerships & Other Information

New Mexico Interagency Council for the Prevention of Obesity

The New Mexico Interagency Council for the Prevention of Obesity brings together a diverse group of partners to create collaborative state and local policy, making environmental and programmatic changes for healthy eating, active living, chronic disease and obesity prevention and health equity. The NM Interagency Council for the Prevention of Obesity is charged to:

  1. Build greater alignment across state programs to create sustainable, consistent, and collaborative efforts and messages to increase physical activity, healthy eating and prevent obesity;

  2. Build and support community-wide obesity prevention efforts;

  3. Coordinate and support obesity prevention policy recommendations and initiatives across state agencies;

  4. Collect routine data from Interagency Council members for surveillance and monitoring of progress toward creating environmental, policy and behavioral changes to increase physical activity, healthy eating and healthy weights; and

  5. Establish and maintain an information sharing and communication network. Membership includes: 7 Departments, 35 state programs, and 3 affiliate organizations. Interagency Council members represent the state Departments of:

    1. Health;
    2. Education;
    3. Human Services;
    4. Children, Youth Families;
    5. Aging and Long Term Services;
    6. Agriculture; and
    7. Transportation

  6. Affiliate, non-voting organizations are: New Mexico Healthier Weight Council, NM Cooperative Extension Services, NM Food and Agriculture Policy Council.

Healthy Kids Healthy Communities

Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (HKHC) partners with 9 counties and 4 tribal communities including: Chaves, Cibola, Curry, Dona Ana, Guadalupe, Lea, Luna, McKinley, Rio Arriba (northern), Socorro and Mescalero Apache, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara and Zuni. HKHC is a coalition-led community initiative focused on environmental and systems change to increase healthy eating and physical activity opportunities where children live, learn and play.

Strategies include:

  1. Opening outdoor school space for community use during non-school hours;

  2. Increasing the number of safe walking and biking routes that connect neighborhoods to schools;

  3. Increasing healthy eating and physical activity opportunities in school via classroom fruit and vegetable tastings and fit breaks;

  4. Increasing access to and availability of affordable, healthy, and locally grown foods in schools and the community via farmers’ markets, school and community gardens, and healthy corner stores;

  5. Establishing the New Mexico Centennial 5.2.1.O Challenge in elementary schools statewide; and

  6. Supporting childcare providers in making healthy eating and physical activity a part of their daily routines.
© 2015 New Mexico Children's Cabinet